Trailer liveries that can clean the air

Maidstone, UK: Fleet graphic provider, RGVA has a trailer coating capable of ‘cleaning’ pollutants from the air it passes through. The coating for RGVA Traxx trailer framing system was developed with Clean Air, Resysten, and Hollywood Monster. It is “a major step forward for the transport and logistics industry”, the company says.

The ISO certified product is a clear, spray-on coating activated by sunlight. Primarily targeting harmful nitrogen oxides (NOx) pollutants, a single trailer fitted with Traxx banners can negate the impact of 2,555 average vehicle journeys per year, it says.

Mike Freely, director, Clean Air, says: “We have been working as part of a joint venture with Resysten, the company that created the original advanced antimicrobial surface coating. Together, we have developed that technology over a number of years into an atmospheric pollutant remover.

“The premise of the system is simple: the combination of a trailer’s large surface area and the distances it travels gives the Clean Air coating plenty of opportunities to work its magic. Breaking down airborne pollutants simply by passing through them, we’re able to help businesses as they strive to cut emissions and improve sustainability.”

The Clean Air coating’s core ingredient – titanium dioxide – is a photocatalyst that uses sunlight to break down NOx particles into harmless nitrogen, oxygen and nitrates, dispersing them to the environment.

Exclusively available through RGVA’s innovative Traxx banner system, Clean Air has achieved ISO 22197-1 accreditation for the specialist coating, demonstrating an ability to decompose NOx at a rate of 222mg per m² per day. With 64m² of Traxx banners fitted to a standard 13.6m trailer, a treated system will come into contact with 12,800m³ of air each day, ‘cleaning’ around 5.2kg of NOx over a year.

The photocatalyst properties of titanium dioxide are also known to break down the potent greenhouse gas, nitrous oxide. With the ISO 22197-1 accreditation solely focusing on the urban emissions impact of NOx, Clean Air is set to conduct its own field and lab tests to measure the effect the coating has on N2O. Once concluded, Clean Air will be able to demonstrate the coating’s powerful dual-action, capable of driving improved sustainability and helping businesses meet their own emissions reduction targets, it says.

Kieran McCabe, managing director, RGVA, says: “Though the science behind the Clean Air product is well established, we’ve been working on perfecting it for the transport industry for some time. Through RGVA and Hollywood Monster’s graphics expertise, we’re now able to provide fleet operators with a movable marketing and promotional tool that also delivers a workable sustainability solution – it’s a unique combination that we’re excited to showcase to our customers.”

Printing of the Traxx banners and the application of the coating is carried out by signage company Hollywood Monster. Simon McKenzie, chief executive, Hollywood Monster, says: “This product has the ability to make a big impact at a negligible cost. With looming net zero deadlines, we want to remove the barriers for companies trying to find ways to reduce their day-to-day environmental impact.”